Chalara dieback of ash (Chalara fraxinea)

This is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea. It has been brought into this country through the import of infected young trees.

Ash die-back disease is being treated as a quarantine pest under national emergency measures, and it is important that suspected cases of the disease are reported to the Forestry Commission or FERA (Food and Environment Research Agency) / DEFRA Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs).

If you think you may have an infected tree, contact a qualified tree surgeon who can advise you.

All suspected cases should be reported directly to the Forestry Commission using the online reporting form on their website.

The Forestry Commission website provides detailed information on Chalara fraxinea under the following headings:

  • Description

  • Outbreak stage

  • Symptoms

  • Reporting suspect cases - 08459 33 55 77 (open 8am - 6pm every day)

  • The disease

  • Origin

  • Import and movement restriction.

The website address is www.forestry.gov.uk/chalara

DEFRA have produced a management plan detailing the response to the disease which updates their interim control plan that was published on the 6 December 2012. This can be viewed here: www.defra.gov.uk/publications/2013/03/26/pb13936-chalara-management-plan/

Newcastle City Council are remaining vigilant with regard to its own tree stock and urge private landowners and the public to do the same.

 

Did you know?

Common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is the most severely affected species. Young trees are particularly vulnerable to Chalara fraxinea and succumb to disease rapidly.

Chalara has seriously affected a high percentage of ash trees in continental Europe. 13 There is no evidence that Chalara fraxinea can spread to tree species other than ash or that it is harmful to the health of people or animals.

All suspected cases should be reported directly to the Forestry Commission using the online reporting form on their website.

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