Welcome to Tyne Bridge Publishing. We are based at Newcastle Libraries and publish books on the history of Newcastle upon Tyne and the surrounding region. Whatever your interest, from shipbuilding to suburbs or from the bridges on the Tyne to haunted houses, you're sure to find something you'll enjoy.

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Our latest books

John Grundy’s History of Newcastle

John Grundy, the North East’s favourite TV historian turns his attention to the history of Newcastle upon Tyne. In his inimitable style he tackles questions such as:

  • Where did the Roman bridge at Newcastle actually lead to?
  • What did St Wilfred choose as a holiday souvenir from his trip to Rome?
  • Why did medieval Newcastle need town walls?
  • How was Newcastle reviewed on the 17th century version of Trip Advisor?
  • Where did Newcastle imprison the King?

Always knowledgeable, often funny and sometimes irreverent, this book will be treasured by anyone who is interested in our great regional capital.

The author John Grundy is available to give talks or interviews on the book

ISBN: 9781857951646 RRP £10

Forget Carter: Newcastle on Film and Television

Many people know and associate Newcastle with TV and Film icons Get Carter, Byker Grove, The Tube and Our Friends in the North. However, do you know where Ralph Richardson stole money from in 1939? Why a den of spies were living in Jesmond in 1951? Who met Tommy Lee Jones on the High Level Bridge in 1988? Why Gateshead High Street was under siege in 2009? and which Newcastle flats seem to appear in every programme or film made in Newcastle?

Media historian Chris Phipps takes us on his tour of Newcastle’s film and TV covering old favourites like Payroll and Auf Wiedersehen Pet and shining light on some hidden gems such as The One and Only, Unconditional and The Clouded Yellow.

With contributions from directors Ken Loach (I, Daniel Blake, Kes) and Bryn Higgins (Unconditional), writers Peter Flannery (Our Friends in the North, George Gently), Ian La Frenais (The Likely Lads, Porridge, Auf Wiedersehen, Pet) and Lee Hall (Billy Elliot)and actors Melanie Hill (Bread, Coronation Street), Victoria Elliot (Hebburn , Emmerdale, The Kennedys, 55 Degrees North, Get Carter stage play, Charlie Hardwick (Amber Films, Emmerdale, Byker Grove) and Dave Johns (I, Daniel Blake), this book explores the background to the filming of many television programmes and films in Newcastle.

Newcastle continues to be the perfect film set, seeing filming for Vera and Transformers: The Black Knight in 2016. Forget Carter! What could be next for this photogenic city?’

About the author: Chris Phipps was the BBC’s Black Country Correspondent in the1970s. He moved to the North East to produce Channel 4’s flagship rock show The Tube from Tyne Tees Television in Newcastle from 1982 to 1987. Since then his passionate and expert knowledge of entertainment and popular music has been captured on radio, television, film, print and the speaker’s rostrum. His ITV series Northstars and documentary Chris Rea – Hard is the Road both received prestigious Royal Television Society Awards. This is his second book.

Softback, full colour throughout, over 90 images of actors, locations and productions in the North East – many images have not been seen. 168 pages.

ISBN: 9780993195631 RRP: £9.99

Byker and the Lower Ouseburn

With a history that stretches from the Roman Wall to the Byker Wall and beyond, Byker’s rich industrial heritage includes coal mining, quarrying, lead manufacture, ship building, rope making and even fishing. Glassmaking was introduced in the early 17th century and eventually Byker was supplying window glass to most parts of the country. Pottery was another major industry with the famous Maling factory producing work that is highly collectable today.

The people who worked in these industries needed homes, education and entertainment and author Alan Morgan also explores the history of the suburb’s facilities from churches and cinemas to shops and sports grounds. This detailed and carefully researched book allows you to take a step back in time and explore Byker as you’ve never seen it before.

The author Alan Morgan is available to give talks or interviews on the book

ISBN: 9781857951639 RRP £7.50

The Extraordinary Gertrude Bell: Iraq’s First World War Archeologist

Gertrude Bell (1868 - 1926) was an extraordinary woman. Born into a wealthy and privileged family in the North East of England she chose to spend much of her life far from home as a traveller, explorer and archeologist.

During and after World War I, Bell's extensive knowledge of the Middle East led to her working for the British Government and she was a key individual in the discussions that led to the creation of Iraq following the defeat of the Ottoman Empire. Towards the end of her life she was responsible for setting up the National Museum in Baghdad as well as writing Iraq's first antiquities laws. Gertrude Bell's career has often been overshadowed by her more famous contemporary T.E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia). The varied essays in this book shed light on her legacy and seek to re-establish her importance to the recent history of the Middle East.

Bell was the subject to a recent Hollywood film:

Queen of the Desert is a 2015 American film written and directed by Werner Herzog and is based on the  life of British traveller, writer, archeologist, explorer, cartographer and political officer Gertrude Bell. The film follows Bell's life chronologically, from her early twenties till her death.

The film stars Nicole Kidman, James Franco, Damian Lewis and Robert Pattinson.[ After going through many delays and casting problems, production finally took place from December 2013 to March 2014 in Morocco, Jordan and England.

ISBN: 9781857951622 RRP £6.99

Newcastle Battalions in action on the Somme

Newcastle raised more battalions of volunteer soldiers that went on to see active service than any other British provincial city during the First World War. The first full battalion of Kitchener’s Army, Pioneer battalions, the Tyneside Scottish and the Tyneside Irish Brigades and pre-war Territorial Battalions of The Northumberland Fusiliers were all raised here and all of them served at some point during the Battles on the Somme between 1 July and November 1916. On the first day of the Somme their stalwart bravery and conduct on the field were remarked upon by all who witnessed it; be they the gallant pipers that led the companies over the top or the parade-like lines of the Tyneside Irish as they strode towards the hail of machine gun fire. The losses suffered by these brave battalions were also the worst suffered by any Regiment on that fateful day.

Based on newspaper accounts, war diaries, letters home and access to both public and private collections of local military photographs and memorabilia this book is a tribute to the lads of Newcastle and Northumberland who answered their country’s call and went through the hell that was The Battle of the Somme.

Neil Storey is a respected social historian and author of over 30 books on a variety of social history themes especially on The First World War. Neil Storey recently appeared as an expert on Mary Berry’s Who Do You Think You Are? Members of his extended family served in The Newcastle Commercial battalions during the First World War.
Fiona Kay is a born and bred Geordie girl with a life-long interest in The First World War. Her Grandfather served in The Tyne Electrical Engineers during the First World War.
Both Neil and Fiona are actively involved with the Somme Centenary events in Newcastle and Northumberland.

ISBN: 9781857951592 RRP £7.99

The Real Northern Powerhouse: The Industrial Revolution in the North East

Ever since mankind first used tools there have been far-sighted people who have been determined to find a better way of doing things. In the 18th and 19th centuries, this progression became so rapid that we call it the Industrial Revolution. What some people don’t realise is that many of these pioneers worked on Tyneside, developing new equipment, experimenting with new materials and introducing new processes to make products faster, cheaper, stronger and more reliable.  This book examines the work of those Tyneside trailblazers from medieval times to the 20th century and describes the part they played in a huge range of industries from glassmaking to shipping. At the beginning of the 19th century, railways represented a cheap and efficient way of transporting coal to ports – one hundred years later they were taking British people, goods and ideas around the globe.

Written by north-eastern authorities on industry and industrial archaeology, Alan Morgan, Ken Smith, John Daniels, Dr Stafford Linsley and Dr Tom Yellowley. With foreword by TV Historian Adam Hart-Davis

ISBN: 9781857952230 RRP £7.99

Page last updated: 
11 November 2016
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