Permit applications must include a written description of the way in which pollution is to be minimised. Where a local authority decides to grant an installation permit, that permit must include conditions stipulating how pollution is to be minimised. Government guidance has been published as to the appropriate pollution standards for various types of installation. The law requires the standards to achieve a balance between protecting the environment and the cost of so doing. The local authority is required to have regard to that guidance.

Please contact the Environment and Safety Team on 0191 2116147 or emailing rspp@newcastle.gov.uk to discuss your process before completing any application forms.

Apply for a Part A(2) permit (.doc, 95kb).

Once a permit is issued the operator must comply with the conditions. Where a business fails to comply with the Regulations, local authorities have the power to serve various types of notice and the power to prosecute.  Where possible, however, authorities try to work with the operator to resolve problems.

What if the permit is refused?

Operators can appeal where a permit application is refused or where it is granted but the operator disagrees with the conditions.

When do I apply?

In the majority of cases, operators should apply for an LA-IPPC permit when they have drawn up full designs, but not before starting construction work. All permits should in place for LA-IPPC and LAPPC before operations commence.

Will Tacit Consent Apply?

No. It is in the public interest that the authority must process your application before it can be granted. If you have not heard from the local authority within a reasonable period, please contact it using the contact details below.Local authorities categorise installations according to the risk they represent (high, medium or low risk) based on the potential environmental impact in the event of an incident, and the effectiveness and reliability of the operator.

Fees and risk based inspection method

Local authorities categorise installations according to the risk they represent (high, medium or low risk) based on the potential environmental impact in the event of an incident, and the effectiveness and reliability of the operator. The risk based fee and charges scheme is designed so that industry pays reasonable costs to the local authorities who regulate them under the 'polluter pays' principle. Ultimately the greater the risk, the higher the risk banding the installation will fall into, and the greater the fees payable.

Further information can be found on the DEFRA website.

Page last updated: 
28 October 2013
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